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Randolph Sunglasses: It's Not Just A Pair Of Sunglasses

by John M. White |

Randolph Engineering - Our Story

On April 3rd, 2015 Randolph Engineering invited us to go behind the scenes at Randolph Engineering's factory in Randolph, MA, meet the family and employees and learn why Randolph sunglasses are so special. What follows is a great video showing the people and mission behind Randolph Sunglasses.

Our Story Video

Video Transcript

Peter Waszkiewicz in the video: "My dad said it takes years to build your reputation and only months to tear it down. What he meant by that is quality. Always maintain the quality that got us to where we are today. Our background is engineering my dad was an engineer by trade, his partner was an engineer by trade, so that was engrained in the company. So the passion lives and thrives in the second and now third generation. Our heritage is the military. We’ve been supplying the U.S. Department of Defense with military aviator sunglasses since 1982 and why not offer that same type of quality assurance guarantee to the consumer?" Casey Sullivan, Product Manager – "Here at Randolph Engineering we manufacture and design all of our metal frame sunglasses." Richard Zaleski –Engineering Manager – "We have calculated over 200 individual operations to make one pair of eyeglasses, and this involves over 40 skilled and trained operators and craftsmen. The process has been refined and honed for over 4 decades." Peter – "Does Randolph just produce sunglasses? No, we are actually and eyewear manufacturing company." Casey – "Randolph actually produces three lines of eyewear – handcrafted sunglasses, optical frames and performance sporting eyewear." Peter – "Randolph has a global presence not just here in the United State but we sell in over 40 countries worldwide" Sarah Waszkiewicz, Human Resource Manager - "Randolph is the best because of the quality that we put into our frames. For example, we put 23K Gold plating on our frames whereas other industry standards are to put a flash paint on it. We have five times of gold on our frames versus other companies." Casey – "We guarantee our solder joints for the life of the product. This means where any joint is connected with one another using a filler material of 56% silver this joint cannot fail for the life of the product. You can take these frames, jump up and down on them, twist them – they are indestructible! With every pair of eyeglasses we make it is unique, so the tools have to be unique to make them." Peter –" we have tools that are over 40 years old that my father designed and developed. Some of that tooling is still being used and utilized in our production today. As well as new automated CNC equipment, so a little bit of the old and a little bit of the new. People are buying our product not just for the quality of the product and the styling, they are also buying it for the story that goes behind the product." Various - "It’s not just a pair of glasses, it’s not just a pair of glasses, it’s not just a pair of glasses, it’s a promise, it’s a promise."

Randolph Sunglasses

Randolph Engineering was founded in 1972 as an optical tool and machinery factory. By 1978 Randolph starts producing eyewear because the founders were convinced the consumer deserved a better quality product. Thus Randolph sunglasses and eyewear came into existence. On this website you can find a great selection of Randolph Sunglasses right here: Explore Randolph Engineering Sunglasses]]> On April 3rd, 2015 Randolph Engineering invited us to go behind the scenes at Randolph Engineering's factory in Randolph, MA, meet the family and employees and learn why Randolph sunglasses are so special. What follows is a great video showing the people and mission behind Randolph Sunglasses.

Our Story Video

Vdeo Transcript

Peter Waszkiewicz in the video: "My dad said it takes years to build your reputation and only months to tear it down. What he meant by that is quality. Always maintain the quality that got us to where we are today. Our background is engineering my dad was an engineer by trade, his partner was an engineer by trade, so that was engrained in the company. So the passion lives and thrives in the second and now third generation. Our heritage is the military. We’ve been supplying the military with pilot sunglasses since 1978 and why not offer that same type of quality assurance guarantee to the consumer." Casey Sullivan, Product Manager – "Here at Randolph Engineering we manufacture and design all of our metal frame sunglasses." Richard Zaleski –Engineering Manager – "We have calculated over 200 individual operations to make one pair of eyeglasses, and this involves over 40 skilled and trained operators and craftsmen. The process has been refined and honed for over 4 decades." Peter – "Does Randolph just produce sunglasses? No, we are actually and eyewear manufacturing company." Casey – "Randolph actually produces three lines of eyewear – handcrafted sunglasses, optical frames and performance sporting eyewear." Peter – "Randolph has a global presence not just here in the United State but we sell in over 40 countries worldwide" Sarah Waszkiewicz, Human Resource Manager - "Randolph is the best because of the quality that we put into our frames. For example, we put 23K Gold plating on our frames whereas other industry standards are to put a flash paint on it. We have five times of gold on our frames versus other companies." Casey – "We guarantee our solder joints for the life of the product. This means where any joint is connected with one another using a filler material of 56% silver this joint cannot fail for the life of the product. You can take these frames, jump up and down on them, twist them – they are indestructible! With every pair of eyeglasses we make it is unique, so the tools have to be unique to make them." Peter –" we have tools that are over 40 years old that my father designed and developed. Some of that tooling is still being used and utilized in our production today. As well as new automated CNC equipment, so a little bit of the old and a little bit of the new. People are buying our product not just for the quality of the product and the styling, they are also buying it for the story that goes behind the product." Various - "It’s not just a pair of glasses, it’s not just a pair of glasses, it’s not just a pair of glasses, it’s a promise, it’s a promise."

Randolph Sunglasses

Randolph Engineering was founded in 1972 as an optical tool and machinery factory. By 1978 Randolph starts producing eyewear because the founders were convinced the consumer deserved a better quality product. Thus Randolph sunglasses and eyewear came into existence. On this website you can find a great selection of Randolph Sunglasses.";s:3:"url";s:31:"https://aviator-sunglasses.net/";}}]]> Of course this leads to some interesting things going on. He perceives decadance and sleaze all around him which in turn feeds his urge to take violent action. Along the way he attempts to save a preadolescent prostitute in the process.

Randolph Aviator Sunglasses & Robert Di Nero

Did you notice? In the picture above Robert Di Nero is wearing a pair of Randolph Engineering Gold Frame Gray Lens aviator sunglasses. The smirk tells it all: I'm a smart ass. Those sunglasses have gold plating on them and NOT flash paint, so the frames remain beautiful for many years. Even today we sell replacement lenses and nose pads for the sunglasses because the frame is still in such great shape. If you think you would look great in a pair of these aviator sunglasses you can find them on our website at Randolph Aviator Sunglasses.

Film Review

Here is a review of the film by Roger Ebert printed January 1, 1976
"Taxi Driver" shouldn't be taken as a New York film; it's not about a city but about the weathers of a man's soul, and out of all New York he selects just those elements that feed and reinforce his obsessions. The man is Travis Bickle, ex-Marine, veteran of Vietnam, composer of dutiful anniversary notes to his parents, taxi driver, killer. The movie rarely strays very far from the personal, highly subjective way in which he sees the city and lets it wound him. It's a place, first of all, populated with women he cannot have: Unobtainable blondwomen who might find him attractive for a moment, who might join him for a cup of coffee, but who eventually will have to shake their heads and sigh, "Oh, Travis!" because they find him ... well, he's going crazy, but the word they use is "strange." And then, even more cruelly, the city seems filled with men who can have these women -- men ranging from cloddish political hacks to street-corner pimps who, nevertheless, have in common the mysterious ability to approach a woman without getting everything wrong. Travis could in theory look for fares anywhere in the city, but he's constantly drawn back to 42nd Street, to Times Square and the whores, street freaks, and porno houses. It's here that an ugly kind of sex comes closest to the surface -- the sex of buying, selling, and using people. Travis isn't into that, he hates it, but Times Square feeds his anger. His sexual frustration is channeled into a hatred for the creeps he obsessively observes. He tries to break the cycle -- or maybe he just sets himself up to fail again. He sees a beautiful blonde working in the storefront office of a presidential candidate. She goes out with him a couple of times, but the second time he takes her to a hard-core film and she walks out in disgust and won't have any more to do with him. All the same, he calls her for another date, and it's here that we get close to the heart of the movie. The director, Martin Scorsese, gives us a shot of Travis on a pay telephone -- and then, as the girl is turning him down, the camera slowly dollies to the right and looks down a long, empty hallway. Pauline Kael's review called this shot -- which calls attention to itself -- a lapse during which Scorsese was maybe borrowing from Antonioni. Scorsese calls this shot the most important one in the film. Why? Because, he says, it's as if we can't bear to watch Travis feel the pain of being rejected. This is interesting, because later, when Travis goes on a killing rampage, the camera goes so far as to adopt slow motion so we can see the horror in greater detail. That Scorsese finds the rejection more painful than the murders is fascinating, because it helps to explain Travis Bickle, and perhaps it goes some way toward explaining one kind of urban violence. Travis has been shut out so systematically, so often, from a piece of the action that eventually he has to hit back somehow. Taxi Driver is a brilliant nightmare and like all nightmares it doesn't tell us half of what we want to know. We're not told where Travis comes from, what his specific problems are, whether his ugly scar came from Vietnam -- because this isn't a case study, but a portrait of some days in his life. There's a moment at a political rally when Travis, in dark glasses, smiles in a strange way that reminds us of those photos of Bremer just before he shot Wallace. The moment tells us nothing, and everything: We don't know the specifics of Travis's complaint, but in a chilling way we know what we need to know of him. The film's a masterpiece of suggestive characterization; Scorsese's style selects details that evoke emotions, and that's the effect he wants. The performances are odd and compelling: He goes for moments from his actors, rather than slowly developed characters. It's as if the required emotions were written in the margins of their scripts: Give me anger, fear, dread.

Remember This Scene?

[fvplayer src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/Aviator-Sunglasses/De_Niro_Taxi_Driver.mp4" splash="https://aviator-sunglasses.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Robert_De_Niro_Taxi_Driver.jpg"]

Randolph Aviator Sunglasses

If you love the sunglasses in this movie then check them out at Randolph Aviator Sunglasses.]]> Of course this leads to some interesting things going on. He perceives decadance and sleaze all around him which in turn feeds his urge to take violent action. Along the way he attempts to save a preadolescent prostitute in the process.

Randolph Aviator Sunglasses & Robert Di Nero

Did you notice? In the picture above Robert Di Nero is wearing a pair of Randolph Engineering Gold Frame Gray Lens aviator sunglasses. The smirk tells it all: I'm a bad ass. Those sunglasses have gold plating on them and NOT flash paint, so the frames remain beautiful for many years. Even today we sell replacement lenses and nose pads for the sunglasses because the frame is still in such great shape. If you think you would look great in a pair of these aviator sunglasses you can find them on our website at Randolph Aviator Sunglasses.

Film Review

Here is a review of the film by Roger Ebert printed January 1, 1976
"Taxi Driver" shouldn't be taken as a New York film; it's not about a city but about the weathers of a man's soul, and out of all New York he selects just those elements that feed and reinforce his obsessions. The man is Travis Bickle, ex-Marine, veteran of Vietnam, composer of dutiful anniversary notes to his parents, taxi driver, killer. The movie rarely strays very far from the personal, highly subjective way in which he sees the city and lets it wound him. It's a place, first of all, populated with women he cannot have: Unobtainable blondwomen who might find him attractive for a moment, who might join him for a cup of coffee, but who eventually will have to shake their heads and sigh, "Oh, Travis!" because they find him ... well, he's going crazy, but the word they use is "strange." And then, even more cruelly, the city seems filled with men who can have these women -- men ranging from cloddish political hacks to street-corner pimps who, nevertheless, have in common the mysterious ability to approach a woman without getting everything wrong. Travis could in theory look for fares anywhere in the city, but he's constantly drawn back to 42nd Street, to Times Square and the whores, street freaks, and porno houses. It's here that an ugly kind of sex comes closest to the surface -- the sex of buying, selling, and using people. Travis isn't into that, he hates it, but Times Square feeds his anger. His sexual frustration is channeled into a hatred for the creeps he obsessively observes. He tries to break the cycle -- or maybe he just sets himself up to fail again. He sees a beautiful blonde working in the storefront office of a presidential candidate. She goes out with him a couple of times, but the second time he takes her to a hard-core film and she walks out in disgust and won't have any more to do with him. All the same, he calls her for another date, and it's here that we get close to the heart of the movie. The director, Martin Scorsese, gives us a shot of Travis on a pay telephone -- and then, as the girl is turning him down, the camera slowly dollies to the right and looks down a long, empty hallway. Pauline Kael's review called this shot -- which calls attention to itself -- a lapse during which Scorsese was maybe borrowing from Antonioni. Scorsese calls this shot the most important one in the film. Why? Because, he says, it's as if we can't bear to watch Travis feel the pain of being rejected. This is interesting, because later, when Travis goes on a killing rampage, the camera goes so far as to adopt slow motion so we can see the horror in greater detail. That Scorsese finds the rejection more painful than the murders is fascinating, because it helps to explain Travis Bickle, and perhaps it goes some way toward explaining one kind of urban violence. Travis has been shut out so systematically, so often, from a piece of the action that eventually he has to hit back somehow. Taxi Driver is a brilliant nightmare and like all nightmares it doesn't tell us half of what we want to know. We're not told where Travis comes from, what his specific problems are, whether his ugly scar came from Vietnam -- because this isn't a case study, but a portrait of some days in his life. There's a moment at a political rally when Travis, in dark glasses, smiles in a strange way that reminds us of those photos of Bremer just before he shot Wallace. The moment tells us nothing, and everything: We don't know the specifics of Travis's complaint, but in a chilling way we know what we need to know of him. The film's a masterpiece of suggestive characterization; Scorsese's style selects details that evoke emotions, and that's the effect he wants. The performances are odd and compelling: He goes for moments from his actors, rather than slowly developed characters. It's as if the required emotions were written in the margins of their scripts: Give me anger, fear, dread.

Remember This Scene?

[fvplayer src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/Aviator-Sunglasses/De_Niro_Taxi_Driver.mp4" splash="https://aviator-sunglasses.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Robert_De_Niro_Taxi_Driver.jpg"]

Randolph Aviator Sunglasses

If you love the sunglasses in this movie then check them out at Randolph Aviator Sunglasses.

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