Your Shopping Cart

It appears that your cart is currently empty!

CONTINUE SHOPPING

Saved By Sunglasses!

by John M. White |

The attack took place in 2009 in Ramadi in Iraq, a Taliban stronghold where snipers were paid for killing American soldiers. The higher the soldiers rank the more money the Taliban sniper would get. Unfortunately for this sniper he wasn't lucky enough to collect his reward as he was caught and incarcerated for his attack.

The Attack

In a February 6th 2014 article by Dan Corcoran on Channel 5 in Vero Beach, Florida Sgt May recounted his attack as follows:
"The bullet went into my face and then proceeded through the inside of my face exiting out my temple," said former U.S. Army Sgt. Martin May. "We didn't know the violence of the past. We were never told of that," he said. Sgt. May, who now lives in Vero Beach, was providing a personal security detail for government officials touring reconstruction sites. You don't know who's got a gun; almost everybody does, said May. "So, you don't know who's out there to cause you harm." May certainly had no idea that he would become a target. "You'll see the circle around the guy - that's me," he said pointing to a video playing on his computer screen. He was in the crosshairs of a sniper. I came back around to the right and I got popped, he said. He was also in the focus of a photographer who was secretly recording every second, including the sniper shot to his head. I actually knelt down to put my finger in my head in the hole in my head and when I figured out that my finger including the glove fit, I'd been shot, said May. May said what stood between him and death were his sunglasses. The Oakley's actually folded into my face with the bullet which - they're the ones that saved my life - is wearing the protective gear that I was required to wear, he said of his ballistic-resistant eye wear supplied by the military. "Soon as it hit my face, then it went and turned and they went almost like a football that's being kicked through my face." He lost his left eye, a portion of his skull, his sinuses - even his ability to cry. Sgt. May spent months in the hospital and began researching sniper attacks on U.S. soldiers. He scrutinized videos posted online by suspected terrorist groups; short clips touting the shooting - even the killing - of American service members.

Video On Oakley Ballistic Eyewear

Sunglasses

While most of us don't need this kind of eye wear protection a good pair of sunglasses are still essential to protect our eyes from injury or disease. You can find some great Randolph Engineering sunglasses right here on our website at Randolph Engineering Sunglasses. Have a prosperous day! p.s. Please share "Saved By Sunglasses" with your friends - thanks! The attack took place in 2009 in Ramadi in Iraq, a Taliban stronghold where snipers were paid for killing American soldiers. The higher the soldiers rank the more money the Taliban sniper would get. Unfortunately for this sniper he wasn't lucky enough to collect his reward for two reasons: he was caught on video tape shooting at Sgt May and was caught and incarcerated for his attack.

The Attack

In a February 6th 2014 article by Dan Corcoran on Channel 5 in Vero Beach, Florida Sgt May recounted his attack as follows:
"The bullet went into my face and then proceeded through the inside of my face exiting out my temple," said former U.S. Army Sgt. Martin May. "We didn't know the violence of the past. We were never told of that," he said. Sgt. May, who now lives in Vero Beach, was providing a personal security detail for government officials touring reconstruction sites. You don't know who's got a gun; almost everybody does, said May. "So, you don't know who's out there to cause you harm." May certainly had no idea that he would become a target. "You'll see the circle around the guy - that's me," he said pointing to a video playing on his computer screen. He was in the crosshairs of a sniper. I came back around to the right and I got popped, he said. He was also in the focus of a photographer who was secretly recording every second, including the sniper shot to his head. I actually knelt down to put my finger in my head in the hole in my head and when I figured out that my finger including the glove fit, I'd been shot, said May. May said what stood between him and death were his sunglasses. The Oakley's actually folded into my face with the bullet which - they're the ones that saved my life - is wearing the protective gear that I was required to wear, he said of his ballistic-resistant eye wear supplied by the military. "Soon as it hit my face, then it went and turned and they went almost like a football that's being kicked through my face." He lost his left eye, a portion of his skull, his sinuses - even his ability to cry. Sgt. May spent months in the hospital and began researching sniper attacks on U.S. soldiers. He scrutinized videos posted online by suspected terrorist groups; short clips touting the shooting - even the killing - of American service members.

The Video

Sunglasses

While most of us don't need this kind of eye wear protection a good pair of sunglasses are still essential to protect our eyes from injury or disease. You can find some great Randolph Engineering sunglasses right here on our website at Randolph Engineering Sunglasses. Have a prosperous day! p.s. Please share "Saved By Sunglasses" with your friends - thanks!

Comments (0)

Leave a comment