Bayonet vs Skull Aviator Temples For Sunglasses

One of the most common questions I get about aviator sunglasses is on bayonet versus skull temples.

First, there is a lot of confusion about what to call those arms on the side of sunglasses.

Temples

Temples are those arms which are attached to either side of the front of a pair of aviator sunglasses which go from the front of the sunglasses frame backwards on the side of the wearer's head.

I have heard them called everything from arms to thingamajigs. Everyone seems to be confused about the correct nomenclature of sunglass frame parts.

The temples are simply the things that hold the sunglasses in place on your head!

The first glasses were monocles which were simply round pieces holding magnifying lenses held over one's eye socket.

As glasses developed they eventually had temples that curved over, behind and underneath the ears.

While this held the glasses in place they many times caused irritation to the ear.

Over the years there have been many improvements in aviator sunglasses temples including the materials and style of temples offered.

Bayonet Aviator Temples

Bayonet temples were designed for military pilots to slip easily under helmets and headsets.

Early military pilots found there were times when they needed remove their sunglasses while wearing a helmet.

For example, when passing into and out of weather.

They found that it was a challenge to remove a helmet or headset to take the aviator sunglasses off or put them back on.

The invention of bayonet temples made it simple because they go straight back and don't curve down behind the ears.

Sunglasses with bayonet temples can easily be removed and replaced without removing you're headset or helmet.

If you wear a helmet, headset or other headgear bayonet aviator temples are a great choice for you.

Do Bayonet Temples Fall Off When Lowering Your Head?

The bayonet temple arms go straight back but have an inward curve that follows the curve of your head and fit snugly against the head.

The bayonet style aviator temples have enough curve in them and are rigid enough and fit snugly enough that they will not fall off even when looking down at a chart or looking around inside the cockpit.

Skull Aviator Temples

Skull aviator temples are often called "Hockey Stick" temples because of their resemblance to hockey sticks.

The skull temple arms go back along the side of the wearer's head and then curve down over the back of the ear.

The skull temple is like the standard temples you would find on an ordinary pair of eye glasses you get from the optometrist.

Because not everyone is a pilot, nor uses helmets, headsets or other head gear, skull aviator temples work well for them.

However, for some people skull aviator temples don't work well because they can irritate the back of the ear lobe causing some discomfort over time.

As a result of this some think about using the bayonet style of aviator temple but are concerned that they will not remain in place while moving their heads.

Some people are concerned that aviator sunglasses with bayonet temples might slip off their heads; however, as a pilot I have worn this style of aviator temple for years and have no problems whatsoever.

Check out these cool military aviator sunglasses with bayonet temples.

It's Your Call

In the final analysis it is up to the wearer to choose the correct aviator temple style for themselves.

I hope this has been a helpful to answer the "Bayonet vs Skull Temples" question.

In the meantime keep your wings straight and level Hersch!

Bayonet vs Skull Temples On Aviator Sunglasses

The difference between bayonet and skull temples in aviator sunglasses

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